Tuesday, February 01, 2011

The Muslim Brotherhood 's record of 'moderation'

Hassan al-Banna, the 'Muslim Rasputin'

With thanks to Elder of Ziyon and Eliyahu

Who says that the Muslim Brotherhood (Ikhwan), waiting in the wings to seize power in Egypt, are non-violent moderates? The BBC for a start. The excellent Elder of Ziyon has been trawling the writings of John Roy Carlson, which show the Ikhwan to be anything but. A US journalist, Carlson in 1948 interviewed the leaders of this xenophobic Islamist movement, founded in Egypt 20 years earlier. Would Jeremy Bowen, the BBC's Middle East editor, please take note?

Carlson describes the Brotherhood, which then had hundreds of thousands of followers across the Arab world, as 'ultranationalist, ultra-religionist, ultra-fanatic Moslems whose only liberalism is the liberal use of terror.'

Their founder, Hassan al-Banna, 'is so sinister in his record of intrigue and murder that even the Green Shirts refer to him as the Moslem Rasputin.'

Even in 1948, they admitted they were unabashed allies of the Nazis and supporters of their genocidal project against the Jews. One Ikhwan told Carlson: "If General Rommel had won, we would have been independent now. The Germans and the Italians would have been real friends of the Arab...There would have been no England, no Partition, no Zionism or any Jewish problem, and no Jews left in the world."

From the beginning they targeted Jews in Egypt: "The Jew, if left to his own resources in Egypt, is doomed to pogrom and persecution."

"This, one 'cut-throat' told Carlson, pointing to his automatic weapon, "is for the Jew in battle. But this", he said, patting his dagger,"is for the Jew in Cairo."

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6 comments:

Stuart said...

It's not good is it!

bataween said...

You could say that!

Sylvia said...

The Muslim Brotherhood are not exactly "waiting in the wings". They have been distributing instructions all along and building up Al Baradei on their websites.
Al Baradei is to the Muslim Brotherhood what Bakhtiar was to the Khomeini revolution.
If appointed, Al Baradei will lift the ban on the Muslim Brotherhood which will bring the exiled leadership to Egypt and give them time to regroup, organize and take control of the main ionstitutions.
It can take months or even years.

Anecdotal but telling: Omar Sharif, who has also called on Mubarak to step down, has fled to Madrid.

bataween said...

Thanks for the update, Sylvia. Al-Baradei does not strike one as a credible leader, but I suppose he would only be a stopgap until the MB got firmly entrenched.
As for Omar Sharif, I'm surprised he wasn't living in Beverley Hills!

Sylvia said...

Someone posted on a Hebrew site that fire was set to a synagogue in Southern Tunisia Torah scrolls burnt down. But no link was provided.

Anonymous said...

1. It is impossible to impose democracy on a people who simply cannot understand the concept.
2. As history shows, these poor people will wind up living under a much stricter, more repressive regime than they have now (re:Iranian revolution)
3. They will be led to waste resources fighting Israel, because they don't recognize the enemy within.